Sign In Forgot Password

Hanukka Schedule 2018

 

Hanukka begins the evening of December 2nd and will end the evening of December 10th. 
**This year we have no Hanukka party scheduled at CBS. **

Wednesday, December 5th
8:15 a.m. -Hanukka Morning Services with Hallel and Torah Reading.

Friday, December 7th
5:30 p.m. Friday Night Shabbat, Hanukka, and Rosh Hodesh Services. *Remember to light the Hanukia before lighting the Shabbat candles. (candle lighting at home at 5:05 p.m.) *

Shabbat December 8th
9:30 a.m.- Shabbat and Hanukka and Rosh Hodesh morning services, followed by a festive Hallel, Torah reading and Musaf for Shabbat and Rosh Hodesh. 
12:00 p.m. Special Latke Kiddush in celebration of Hanukka, Shabbat, and Rosh Hodesh. 

Sunday, December 9th
9:00 am- Hanukka and Rosh Hodesh Morning Prayers including Hallel, Torah Reading, and Musaf for Rosh Hodesh. 

Customs and Laws of Hanukka
1) Lighting Candles. 
The main mitsva of Hanukka is to kindle lights in commemoration of the rededication of the 2nd Temple after the Maccabean revolt against the Seleucid Empire. The misva can be fulfilled by lighting even one candle each night. However, the most widespread custom is to light an additional candle each night, starting with one candle on the first night, and ending with 8 candles on the last night. And addition to these candles, another candle is lit called the Shamash. This candle was added in order not benefit from the lights of the Hanukkia, making the Hanukkia lights special and holy. Today with the proliferation of electric lighting, the shamash isn't necessary as before, as people will be using their electric lights to light their home, and the Hanukka lights to publicize the miracle. 
It is the custom of some to use the Shamash candle to light the Hanukka candles. 

2) The Miracle of Oil
Since the Miracle of Hanukka came through the oil that lasted for 8 days, the most preferable way to light the Hanukkia is with olive oil. However, wax paraffin candles are also commonly used.  In fact, it is also permissible to use an electric hanukkia to fulfill the mitzva. 

3) When to light 
The earliest time to light the Hanukkia is an hour and 15 minutes before sunset, as long as the lights continue to burn for 30 minutes after sunset. The most widespread custom is to light after sunset. Even though these are the common customs, it is more important for all family members to be present during the lighting of the Hannukiah than for the Hannukiah to be lit in a timely manner.  On Erev Shabbat, of course, the candles must be lit before sunset. 

4) Not Working while the Hanukkia is lit
The Halakha speaks of women not working for at least 30 minutes after the candles have been lit. Men are not mentioned because traditionally they didn't do any housework. It needed to be clarified that women too should be exempted during Hanukka in order to enable the family to spend time together. Today in our egalitarian society it must be stressed that both men and women should not work while the hanukkia is lit so that family can spend quality time together. This means that people shouldn't text, answer e-mails, do chores, or catch up on budgeting or repairs, and instead use that time to play games, tell stories, sing songs, or eat a festive meal. 

5) Food, Fun, and Joy.
Many people have special foods that are associated with Hanukka. For Sepharadim, many communities made bimuelos, fried donuts flavored with honey, sugar,  and cinnamon. Ashkenazi communities made latkes and in Israel, sufganiyot are popular. All of these foods are fried in oil and help connect the food to the holiday. Dairy foods are also popular to commemorate the bravery of Judith, and how she defeated the General Holofernes by feeding him cheese and wine. 
Ashkenazim have the custom of playing with a dreidel during Hanukka, which was borrowed from German Christmas games. Dreidel is very popular and can be very fun when played in groups. These nights should be spent doing things that bring joy to us, and to build comradery in our communities. 

6) Shabbat Halbasha
The Shabbat that falls during Hanukka was called Shabbat Halbasha by the Mediterranean Jewish communities. We would remember that there are people have less than we do, and it our days of joy that we should remember them and help them. People would collect clothes to give to the poor, and to ensure that they would be warm. This custom should be remembered and extra effort should be made to include others in our celebrations, to care for the poor and hungry in our community. 

7) Hag haBanoth
In North African communities, the 7th night of Hanukka is a special celebration for the women knowns as Hag HaBanoth, the Festival of Daughters. It commemorates the vital role women have played in ensuring the survival of the Jewish people and recognizes how women strengthen our tradition. 

8) Zot Hanukka 

The last day of Hanukka is known by some as Zot Hanukka from the verse read on this day in the synagogue Numbers 7:84.  According to the teachings of Hasidut, this day is the final "seal" of the High Holiday season of Yom Kippur and is considered a time to repent out of love for God. In this spirit, many Hasidic Jews wish each other Gmar chatimah tovah. It is taught in Hasidic and literature that this day is particularly auspicious for the fulfillment of prayers.


Happy Hanukka! Hanukka Sameah! A Zissen Hanukka! Hanukka Alegre!  

Hanukka is known by some as Zot Hanukka from the verse read on this day in the synagogue Numbers 7:84.  According to the teachings of Hasidut, this day is the final "seal" of the High Holiday season of Yom Kippur and is considered a time to repent out of love for God. In this spirit, many Hasidic Jews wish each other Gmar chatimah tovah. It is taught in Hasidic and literature that this day is particularly auspicious for the fulfillment of prayers.


Happy Hanukka! Hanukka Sameah! A Zissen Hanukka! Hanukka Alegre!  

Wed, December 19 2018 11 Tevet 5779